The Broke Professional - Grow your money and yourself

The Investing Book That Won My Heart

Reading books will make you a better investor.

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Life is a journey, but the beginning of that journey can have a profound effect on the rest.  Reading one book in particular completely changed the trajectory of my investing journey.

While you can learn to like new foods as an adult, most of our food preferences are formed when we are young.

Most sports fans, myself included, root for their hometown team.  If you were born anywhere else, you would most likely have rooted for that hometown team.  (Though never the Philadelphia Eagles.  NEVER)

In the same way, while my views on investing have slightly evolved over time, my core investing philosophies came from a book I read years ago and immediately connected with.

That book is The Bogleheads Guide to Investing (hereafter referred to as The Guide).  I’ve read a few investment books before I read The Guide and I just didn’t connect with them.  I’ve read a bunch of investment books after I read The Guide and most of them were not as memorable.

The Guide was a life changing book for me because it presents an investing blueprint that made sense and was easy to implement.  The idea of technical analysis and digging through charts and graphs while following the comings and goings of companies doesn’t appeal to me.

(As a simple introduction, a Boglehead refers to a follower of the philosophy of John Bogle, the founder of The Vanguard Group.  This book as a comprehensive investing guide written by some big time Bogleheads.)

Here are the two reasons why this is my favorite investing book:

Investing Should Be Simple

If you want to make money off of the general public, keep them confused and helpless.  Electricians and plumbers want people to call them anytime they have a problem.  They can charge for materials and whatever they want for labor.  You are dancing to their tune.

They DO NOT want you to go on YouTube and find out the solution to the problem on your own.  Contractors don’t want you to go online and get the materials you need at a cheaper price.  They will go out of business this way.

But the more you do this, the more knowledge you’ll gain and the simpler things will become.  You will also save a lot of money in the process.  And let’s face it, you don’t need to get a PhD in plumbing to become a good plumber.  You need to find solutions to various plumbing issues.  Doing this over time will make you an expert.

The investing industry is very similar.  Investment advisers and brokers have a (wait for it…) VESTED interest in keeping you confused.  They want you to think investing is a very complicated topic that requires decades of expertise to master.  That way, you will be forking over your hard earned money without question.

The Guide says otherwise.  It showed me that as long as you are aware of your financial goals and risk tolerance, knowing what to invest in becomes very simple.  The key is to stick to your plan despite the ups and downs along the way.

And there will be ups and downs.  That’s the nature of investing.  And this is where most investment companies will get you.  They will make you believe that only they know when the markets will go up or down and that’s why you need to keep paying them.

The simplicity of it all will shock you.  But it will also empower you to take control of your investments and focus your time and energy on everything else that matters in your life.

Investing Need Not Be Expensive

The aforementioned investment advisers and brokers who want to keep you confused and take your money?  They don’t come cheap.  Most financial advisers who manage your investments will take a cut of your assets every year, usually 1% or more.

Plus, they can potentially put you into investments that have high expense ratios while not offering you similar ones with lower expense ratios.  (An expense ratio is what you’re charged by the mutual fund company just to be invested in the fund.)  And advisers can receive a kickback from mutual fund companies for putting you in a certain investment.

This goes on top of the fee the adviser takes.  Not good.  The effect of high fees on your investment returns has been well documented.  Most mutual fund managers cannot beat the average market return in one year, let alone for decades.  So there is no way to justify high fees.

The answer according to The Guide is to stick with mutual funds that have rock bottom fees and track the performance of the overall market you are looking to invest in.  In real terms, this means investing with index funds from Vanguard.  This will give you two major benefits:

1.  You will be paying very low fees

2.  Your investment portfolio will be very simple to manage

These two points will put you way ahead of the majority of investors.  Those investors are paying high fees and buy and sell at the whim of the market.  Investing with Vanguard index funds for the long term will allow you to fully take advantage of compound interest.

Conclusion

The Guide has taught me to focus exclusively on index funds from Vanguard, and that’s where the vast majority of my investments are.  The only exception is the 529 college plan for my son, which doesn’t contain any Vanguard funds.

Focusing on Vanguard index funds has provided a great return for my portfolio, but that could be attributed to the bull market that has been chugging along since 2009.  More importantly, The Guide has showed me that investing with Vanguard will give my money the best chance to grow over the long term because of low fees and a simple investing plan.

If you can’t tell by now, I highly recommend this book.  It will set beginning investors on the right path while showing veteran investors that this is ultimately the best way to invest your money.  And it will turn you into a devoted Boglehead like me.

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Are Physician Loans a Good Idea?

doc-house

Recent graduates of professional school are in a unique position.  They usually have high amounts of debt and low savings. Not a good recipe to buy a home.  Almost everybody with high debt and low savings will get denied for a traditional mortgage.

But one thing almost all professional school grads have is high potential income. So a number of banks offer Physician Loans (also called Doctor Loans) geared towards new professionals.  Most of these loans are geared towards MD’s.  But other health professionals, such as optometrists, can take advantage of them also.

Nuts and Bolts

I wrote about Doctor Loans in a previous post, but since I’m now a few years into having one, I wanted to revisit the subject.  Here are the key aspects of a Doctor Loan:

Pros

  • Requires little to no down payment
  • Doesn’t require Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI)
  • Doesn’t factor in student loan debt, which is usually high for professionals
  • Will accept a job offer or contract as proof of earnings

Cons

  • Available only to new grads, usually a maximum of 5-10 years out of residency or school
  • Can have higher fees and interest rates than conventional loans
  • Certain types of homes may be restricted
  • Some banks might require the customer open a checking or savings account with the bank

It’s also important to know why banks would offer a Doctor Loan.  Lenders are looking for customers who will make their payments on time and have a good relationship with the bank for years to come.  Professionals usually have high income potential, so banks want them as customers for life.  They will offer premium checking accounts and preferred rates for customers with mortgages.

My Take on Physician Loans

Now that we have the pros and cons out of the way, let me give you my opinion of the Doctor Loan.  I decided to use the Doctor Loan because we wanted a house after renting for a couple of years but didn’t have the 20% down payment needed for a conventional loan.  By not having at least 20% for a down payment I would have to pay Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI).  This is just an extra monthly payment to the bank that would not even be tax deductible in our case.

After finally finding a bank that offered Doctor Loans for optometrists, I went thorough the usual ton of paperwork required for a mortgage.  I’ve heard some horror stories from others who went through the mortgage application process, but luckily it went pretty smoothly for us.

I ended up selecting a no down payment Adjustable Rate Mortgage (ARM).  While this sounds scary on paper, I believe it was the best decision for us.  Doctor Loan interest rates are usually a little higher than conventional loans. Going with an ARM allowed me to get a rate in line with the average 30-year fixed at that time.

The interest rate on my ARM doesn’t increase until after 10 years, which is a few years longer than we plan to live in the house before selling.  Even if we end up living there a little longer than 10 years, we can still handle the maximum possible payments so it shouldn’t be an issue.

Our plan is to build up enough equity in the house to eventually get a conventional loan on our next home.  The Doctor Loan allowed us to take advantage of low current rates and have an affordable payment.  I don’t regret going with the Doctor Loan, but if we had waited a few more years to build up enough of a down payment for a conventional loan, we might have scored a lower interest rate.

No Free Lunch

Not paying PMI and not having to fork over a large down payment sounds like a good deal, but the advantages of that can be erased if you decide to sell too early or you have to settle for a high interest rate.

So are Physician Loans for everyone?  Absolutely not.  Homes are expensive (taxes, maintenance, homeowners association fees etc).  If you rush into a purchase too fast and aren’t ready for the upfront costs, then a Doctor Loan is probably not a good option.  You would be better off learning the basics of home ownership while building up enough of a down payment for a conventional loan.

Mortgage lenders essentially work like see saws.  They can offer low down payment and no PMI, but will have to increase the interest rate.  If you want a lower interest rate, you should be able to offer a good down payment and maybe even pre-pay some of the interest.

There really is no one right answer.  Deciding if a Doctor Loan is right for you depends on your income potential and how long you decide to live in the house, among other things.  Run the numbers and ask those who have been through the mortgage process to see if it would be a good option for you.

If you need some more information, here is a great overview about student loans from Ricardo at Doctor Loan USA.

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