The Broke Professional - Grow your money and yourself

Where to Refinance Your Student Loans

Get some quotes people

Get some quotes people

Sometimes, people just need their hand held when trying something new.  I’ve found this to be the case when recommending student loan refinance to colleagues.

I recently wrote why everyone with student loans should consider refinancing.  The best that could happen is that your interest rate goes down substantially and you save tens of thousands of dollars over the life of the loan.  The worst that could happen is that refinancing is not beneficial and you stay right where you are.

Nothing to lose at all.

And while people generally like doing things that will benefit them, sometimes a little prodding is still necessary.

For example, I know it’s a good idea to try and fix things around the house myself before I call someone.  But I need to watch a couple of good step by step videos on Youtube before anything actually gets done.  That’s just the way I am.

Many people are like this when it comes to saving money.  They know it’s a good idea to open up a savings account and contribute to it automatically, find a less onerous checking account or sign up for a rewards credit card. But sometimes a little kick in the pants is needed to get going.

This post will serve as that kick in the pants.  I will show you how easy the student loan refinance process is and what companies you should consider.  Let’s get started.

(I will use screenshots from SoFi since they do not require a hard credit check before getting quotes.  More on that later.)

Step 1:  Go to the lender’s website

SoFi page 1

Just type in SoFi.com (or better yet use this link and get $100 if your loan gets approved.)

Most online student loan refinancing companies have easy to use interfaces.  Once you’re on the home page, simply click “Find My Rate” on the top right.

Step 2:  Enter Your Personal Information

info screen

In order to give you an accurate quote, lenders need some information from you.  The type of information required will vary between lenders, and some lenders will do a credit check before you get your quotes.  So the experience with each company will vary.

(By the way I did not hack into Bill Nye’s SoFi account I just made up an account with his name.  I’m fairly sure he doesn’t have a need for student loan refinancing.)

Typically, the information most lenders require is:

-Basic demographic information

-School information

-Employment information

-Current student loan balances and rates

-A little later in the process, you will probably have to send proof of income and a picture of your license or passport.

Some people are wary of giving companies too much information.  This is not really anything to worry about.  In reality, Facebook has a whole lot more information on us than these companies ever will, so I’m okay with letting them know how much money I make.

Step 3:  Analyze your quotes and make a decision

quotes screen

This is where the fun begins.  After you enter all of your information, companies will run a soft or hard credit check.  A soft check won’t affect your credit score but will still allow you to see some quotes which are going to be pretty close to your actual quote.  A hard credit check will show up on your credit report but will give you very precise quotes.

With the example I used, I assumed a student loan balance of $100,000 with a 7% interest rate and a 25 year term.  The minimum payment would be $706.78.  Making just the minimum payment over those 25 years would amount to a total payment amount of $212,000.  More than double the original loan amount!

I advise to go with the shortest payoff period you’re comfortable with and can afford.  But as you can see, even if you go with a 20 year term it would still result in a lifetime savings of more than $43,000 with a slightly lower than original monthly payment!  That’s why I say refinancing is a no-brainer.

A shorter payoff term will also result in a lower interest rate.  So the shorter you can go, the better it will be.

Fixed or Variable?

The other consideration is if you should go with a fixed interest rate or a variable interest rate.  This discussion deserves a post of its own (that’s a good idea!), but if you opt to go with a longer payoff period, about 10 years or longer, I would suggest sticking with a fixed interest rate.

Interest rates are sort of predictable as far as if they will be going up or down, but the uncertainty lies in when that will happen.  Right now in 2016, for instance, interest rates are pretty low so they are bound to go up at some point.

But that could be 6 months from now or 6 years from now.  There is too much uncertainty over a long period of time.  So for shorter term loans, less than 10 years, variable rates are a good bet and for longer term loans, it’s better to stay with fixed.  Everyone has different risk tolerances so use that as a general guideline.

The last thing to consider is that your rates will probably vary from my results, and will probably vary from someone in your same class.  Companies take into account your credit score, credit history, loan balance, interest rate, where you live, where you work and who knows what else.  The screenshot above is just for illustrative purposes, so make sure to get quotes after putting in your own personal information.

So Which Refinance Company Should I Use?

The student loan refinance arena is growing rapidly.  I keep get letters in the mail from new companies claiming they can refinance my loans at the lowest rate possible.

But let me give you the short answer.  There are only two companies worth your trouble:

#1:  Earnest (get a $200 bonus by using this link)

#2:  SoFi (get a $100 bonus by using this link)

I ended up going with Earnest for my refinance, just because their quoted rate was .05% lower than SoFi’s.  Everything else was pretty much the same with both companies.

Both companies make the onboarding process easy and both companies have great customer service.  You may get different quotes because both companies have different underwriting standards, so get quotes from them both and compare.

If you really truly want more quotes, a good place to look would be Magnify Money.  They will give you a list of all the best student loan refinance companies.  They are also a great resource to find the best checking and savings accounts.

Looking at the potential savings from refinancing I don’t know why anyone would not get a few quotes and see how much they could save.  Refinancing is not a good choice for everyone, but getting quotes online is so easy it really is in your best interest to just take a look.

So to conclude:  Earnest.  SoFi.  See how much you can save.

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4 Books New Grads Should Have Read BEFORE Finishing School

Students in undergraduate and professional school usually have one thing on their minds: sleep!  The next thing is usually studying to do your best (or to just stay afloat) in your respective program.  Many times this requires a laser like focus where nothing else matters except the next test or practical.

But on the other side of that diploma or degree, real life is going to be waiting.  Which means you are going to have to make a lot of financial decisions which could potentially affect the rest of your life.  I would advise students to take a few minutes a week (that’s really all it takes) to read some good books and form some type of financial plan.

I’ve recommended four books for students to read while they’re in school.  Like I said, it just takes a few minutes a week and I know every student can find a few minutes between ping pong tournaments (and studying of course!)

These are light reads that are packed with great information to get you started on the right financial footing.

Good grades are important, but you’re only in school for a small part of your life.  Taking some time to plan the rest of your life is essential.

Here are the recommended books:

I Will Teach You to Be Rich by Ramit Sethi

This is the first book i read after graduating optometry school.  And I’m glad I did.  It touches on some theory when it comes to investing, but it is ultimately a very practical book and this is what I appreciated about it.  Ramit talks about what specific bank accounts he recommends, how to invest and even how to negotiate when buying a car.  The overarching theme from this book is to DO SOMETHING rather than not acting.  Getting 80% of the way there is a whole lot better than getting 0%.

Millionaire Next Door by Thomas Stanley and William Danko

If there ever was a book out there that tells you what REAL wealth looks like, this is it.  MND is a light read that talks about the characteristics of real life millionaires.  Despite what society and the media tells us, millionaires don’t usually drive around in luxury cars and have gigantic houses.  More often than not they are hard working people who spend their money very wisely for a long time.  This book is especially important for those new grads looking to get a new car and/or house right away.  If you want to be a millionaire, this book will show you that’s just not the way to go.

Richest Man in Babylon by George Clason

I was fortunate to read this book while I was in optometry school, and I’m really glad I did.  It is a light and short read that can help establish a solid financial foundation.  The book consists of Biblical sounding parables that contain financial wisdom.  The main theme I got from this book is the biggest financial lesson of all: you will never get ahead unless you spend less than you earn.  Constantly spending 100% of your earnings is no life at all.

The White Coat Investor by James Dahle MD

This is a great book geared mainly to MD’s and other health professionals, but has some great advice for everyone.  The White Coat Investor is a fantastic blog that teaches professionals about student loans, investing and keeping more of your money.  Honestly, it is one of the blogs that inspired me to start blogging and trying to help my fellow broke professionals.  Great book for investors and a must have for anyone graduating from professional school.

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