Equifax Hack and the Botched Response - The Broke Professional

Equifax Hack and the Botched Response

Equifax, one of the big three credit reporting companies in the country, was recently hacked.  The company states that 143 million people were affected.  Which means a lot more people were most likely affected since they are probably reporting a conservatively low number.  They are a business after all.

The population of the US is a little over 300 million.  Meaning almost half of the citizens in the country had their vital information compromised.  What type of information was stolen exactly?

According to Equifax, your name, birthday, address, social security numbers, drivers license numbers and credit card numbers were all compromised.  So essentially all the information a hacker would need to sign up for any type of account.

I miss the days of hackers targeting Home Depot.

So what should we do?  The first thing we should NOT do is listen to Equifax.  Here are 2 reasons why:

1.  They set up a bogus help website that only helps themselves.

Soon after the hack was made public, Equifax set up a pretty crude looking website called equifaxsecurity2017.  That just looks like a fake URL off the bat.

On the site you can check if you’re “potentially impacted” by entering the last 6 digits of your SSN and your last name. Yes, you can check if your information has been compromised by entering even more information.

Once you enter that info, it will say you have been potentially affected.  No matter what you enter, it will say you are potentially affected.  Which means they have no idea if you are potentially affected.

But wait, there’s more!  If you’ve been affected, you get a free trial of TrustedID Premier, the credit monitoring service offered by Equifax.  You’ll get a free trial for a year and then be charged after that if you want to keep it.

So not only did they set up a dubious looking website to get even more of our information, they are trying to take our money after a massive data breach.

Please do NOT sign up for this service.  There are many ways to monitor your credit that are free and easy that I will mention at the end of the article.

As far as the second reason we shouldn’t listen to Equifax:

2.  Equifax execs sold their company stock before the hack was made public.

Like something out of Wolf of Wall Street, three Equifax executives sold their stock in the company before the hack was publicly disclosed.  The official company line was that they had no idea the data breach had occurred.

While I’m a cynic by nature, any rational person could see that is a bald faced lie.  How any executive of any company could not know that their company was exposed in the biggest data breach known to man makes no sense.  Let alone three executives.

While some conciliatory reasons were given such as they didn’t know, and they didn’t sell ALL of their stock (aka these guys are a lot richer than we can imagine), the fact is that this deceptive action did occur.

Because of this, I will have nothing to do with this company or their “TrustedID” program.  And if there ever is a class action lawsuit that I can be a part of, I will be sure to sign right up.

What You Should Do

So what steps should we take to ensure we don’t become victims of identity theft?  Unfortunately, there is no way to completely prevent ID theft.  These hackers are much smarter than us or any company out there.  Like a good defense in football, we need to prepare the best we can and react accordingly:

1.  Monitor your credit reports.  This can be done essentially for free through services like Credit Karma and Credit Sesame.  They will send you an alert whenever there is a change on your credit report.

The best thing we should all do is look at our credit reports.  Go to annualcreditreport.com and request a report from all 3 bureaus (yes, even Equifax).

2.  Submit an initial fraud alert.  This tells any business to take some extra steps to identify you in case there is an application submitted in your name.  This usually means you have to talk to someone when you apply for a credit card or bank account.

Some people say submit a credit freeze, but I don’t think this is necessary since hackers tend to sit on this information for a long time before they act on it.  You won’t be able to apply for any new accounts during that time either, so that’s your call.

3.  Submit your taxes early!!!  Most Americans are procrastinators when it comes to filing taxes.  Many even file extensions because they don’t want to do it by April.

Don’t do that next year.

Tax filing fraud is on the rise, and with this data breach it could potentially be a huge problem for the 2018 tax filing season.  We get most of the forms we need by February.  Once you get the necessary paperwork, just go ahead and file.  Especially if you’re expecting a refund.  Don’t let the government hold on to your money interest free!

Be vigilant about your credit and identity!

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